Rye Street, Heywood, Lancashire, OL104DF

01706 360027

ALL SOULS' CE Primary and Nursery

'a place to grow'

Computing at All Souls' CE

 

Computing Curriculum Rationale

At All Souls’ CE Primary, we are technologists! We want our children to love computing and technology. We want them to have no limits to what their ambitions are and grow up wanting to be software programmers, coders, website creators or innovators! We want them to embody our core values. We all believe that: “there are no limits.’ The computing curriculum has been carefully crafted so that our children develop their computing knowledge and capital. We want our children to remember their computing lessons in our school, to cherish these memories and embrace the opportunities they are presented with! We have a computing club, which is hosted by our school E-Cadets, which takes place weekly, and the children have enjoyed experiences such as using the 3d Printer, Using VR goggles and flying a drone, to help provide inspiration for their own computing work. Bringing technology and computing alive is important at All Souls’ CE Primary School.

Curriculum Intent

The computing curriculum promotes curiosity and a love and thirst for learning. It is ambitious and empowers our children to become independent and resilient – like all curriculum areas.
We want to equip them with not only the minimum statutory requirements of the computing National Curriculum but to prepare them for the opportunities, responsibilities and experiences of later life. We are committed to putting computing on the map here at All Souls’ CE Primary.
We want our children to use the vibrancy of our great town to learn from other cultures, respect diversity, co-operate with one another and appreciate what they have. We achieve this by providing a strong SMSC curriculum, with British Values and our core values placed at the heart of everything we do. This often feeds into the computing curriculum. For example, earlier this year we organised a celebration of online safety, which stemmed from a book stimulus. E –Cadets were integral to the planning of the work and children and parents had the opportunity to learn in depth about how to keep themselves safe online.
We enrich their time in our school with memorable, unforgettable experiences and provide opportunities, which are normally out of reach – this piques their interests and passions. For example, recently a group of pupils visited the ‘Crucial Crew’ in Bury, Manchester. The children were given the opportunity to learn about the dangers presented both in real life and virtual life. They had the opportunity to explore scenarios and ways in which they could seek help. Children were also taught about safety whilst on social media. We firmly believe that it is not just about what happens in the classroom, it is about the added value we offer to really inspire our children.

Curriculum Implementation

A complete audit of the computing curriculum was conducted. Following the findings from this audit, the computing curriculum has been carefully built and the learning opportunities and assessment milestones for each year group crafted to ensure progression and repetition in terms of embedding key learning, knowledge and skills. The way computing is taught at our school has been revamped and now follows a specific and consistent structure. Initially, pupils take inspiration from famous technologists throughout history to help generate ideas for their work. They explore and practice the practical skills and apply key knowledge needed to be fully immersed in the topic. Children record their work on the school server and create a class book to reflect other aspects of the computing curriculum.
Computing subject specific characteristics, which we expect the children to demonstrate, have been developed and shared with all stakeholders. These characteristics underpin all work in computing and form a focal point for display areas and provide a common subject specific vocabulary for staff and pupils.

These characteristics are:

  • A passion for and a commitment to the subject
  • design, write and debug programs that accomplish specific goals, including controlling or simulating physical systems; solve problems by decomposing them into smaller parts
  • use sequence, selection, and repetition in programs; work with variables and various forms of input and output
  • use logical reasoning to explain how some simple algorithms work and to detect and correct errors in algorithms and programs
  • understand computer networks including the internet; how they can provide multiple services, such as the world wide web; and the opportunities they offer for communication and collaboration
  • use search technologies effectively, appreciate how results are selected and ranked, and be discerning in evaluating digital content
  • select, use and combine a variety of software (including internet services) on a range of digital devices to design and create a range of programs, systems and content that accomplish given goals, including collecting, analysing, evaluating and presenting data and information
  • use technology safely, respectfully and responsibly; recognise acceptable/unacceptable behaviour; identify a range of ways to report concerns about content and contact.  

Staff and SLT develop year group specific long-term curriculum maps, which identify when the different subjects and topics will be taught across the academic year. All subjects are taught discretely but staff make meaningful links across subjects. They link prior knowledge to new learning to deepen children’s learning. Our short-term plans are produced on a weekly basis for the duration of the topic. We use these to set out the learning objectives for each lesson, identifying the key skills and knowledge to be taught and engaging activities and resources, which will be used to achieve them.
Staff teach a bi-weekly computing lesson. This was a notable change after the computing audit. This helps to ensure sufficient time is allocated to computing and that the subject matter can be revisited frequently. We believe that by constructing our curriculum this way, we improve the potential for our children to retain what they have been taught, to alter their long-term memory and thus improve the rates of progress they make.

Curriculum Impact

We use both formative and summative assessment information in every computing lesson. Staff use this information to inform their short-term planning and short-term support. This helps us provide the best possible support for all of our pupils. The assessment milestones for each phase have been carefully mapped out and further broken down for each year group. This means that skills in computing are progressive and build year on year.
Our staff use computing formative assessment methods to systematically assess what the children know as the topic progresses and inform their future planning. These formative assessment grids then inform summative assessment judgements for each topic.
Assessment information is collected three times a year and analysed as part of our monitoring cycle. This process provides an accurate and comprehensive understanding of the quality of education in computing. A comprehensive monitoring cycle is developed at the beginning of each academic year. This identifies when monitoring is undertaken. Monitoring in computing includes: work saved on the W drive, whole class ‘Big Books’, lesson observations and/or learning walks, pupil/parent and/or staff voice.
All of this information is gathered and reviewed. It is used to inform further curriculum developments and provision is adapted accordingly.

Key Documentation

Computing programmes of study:

Key Stages 1 and 2

Purpose of study

A high-quality computing education equips pupils to use computational thinking and creativity to understand and change the world. Computing has deep links with mathematics, science and design and technology, and provides insights into both natural and artificial systems. The core of computing is computer science, in which pupils are taught the principles of information and computation, how digital systems work and how to put this knowledge to use through programming. Building on this knowledge and understanding, pupils are equipped to use information technology to create programs, systems and a range of content. Computing also ensures that pupils become digitally literate – able to use, and express themselves and develop their ideas through, information and communication technology – at a level suitable for the future workplace and as active participants in a digital world.

Aims

The national curriculum for computing aims to ensure that all pupils:

  • can understand and apply the fundamental principles and concepts of computer science, including abstraction, logic, algorithms and data representation
  • can analyse problems in computational terms, and have repeated practical experience of writing computer programs in order to solve such problems
  • can evaluate and apply information technology, including new or unfamiliar technologies, analytically to solve problems
  • are responsible, competent, confident and creative users of information and communication technology

Attainment targets

By the end of each key stage, pupils are expected to know, apply and understand the matters, skills and processes specified in the relevant programme of study.

We are not required by law to teach the example content in [square brackets].

Subject content – Key stage 1

Pupils should be taught to:

  • understand what algorithms are, how they are implemented as programs on digital devices, and that programs execute by following precise and unambiguous instructions
  • create and debug simple programs
  • use logical reasoning to predict the behaviour of simple programs
  • use technology purposefully to create, organise, store, manipulate and retrieve digital content
  • recognise common uses of information technology beyond school
  • use technology safely and respectfully, keeping personal information private; identify where to go for help and support when they have concerns about content or contact on the internet or other online technologies

Subject Content – Key Stage 2

Pupils should be taught to:

  • design, write and debug programs that accomplish specific goals, including controlling or simulating physical systems; solve problems by decomposing them into smaller parts
  • use sequence, selection, and repetition in programs; work with variables and various forms of input and output
  • use logical reasoning to explain how some simple algorithms work and to detect and correct errors in algorithms and programs
  • understand computer networks, including the internet; how they can provide multiple services, such as the World Wide Web, and the opportunities they offer for communication and collaboration
  • use search technologies effectively, appreciate how results are selected and ranked, and be discerning in evaluating digital content
  • select, use and combine a variety of software (including internet services) on a range of digital devices to design and create a range of programs, systems and content that accomplish given goals, including collecting, analysing, evaluating and presenting data and information
  • use technology safely, respectfully and responsibly; recognise acceptable/unacceptable behaviour; identify a range of ways to report concerns about content and contact